Are you an accountant who listens? (2 of 3)

Hi everyone!

Hope you all had a great Christmas & New Year.

Sorry about being a bit spotty in my blog posting over the last few weeks. In 2013 my intention is post a blog everyone Monday & Thursday (Australian time).

My last real post was on Monday 17 titled – Are you an accountant that can talk simply? http://whatdoclientsreallywant.com/are-you-an-accountant-who-can-make-things-simple-1-of-3/ so I thought it best to continue the next 2 parts – so here we go.

The second hallmark of effective communication is the ability to listen – really listen. In earlier posts you would have heard me bang on about the importance of listening when meeting and discussing issues with clients and pitching for new business.

I found an excellent list of barriers to effective listening and strategies to promote better listening.

Barriers to effective listening

There are many reasons as to why individuals fail to listen successfully, These include:

  1. Interrupting
  2. Faking attention and tuning out
  3. Becoming emotional
  4. Jumping to conclusions
  5. Getting distracted
  6. Pre-judging the subject
    Wrong focus
  7. Gathering only facts
  8. Inflexibility while listening
  9. Avoiding complicated subjects

Strategies to promote better listening

You can improve your listening skills by following some of the strategies mentioned below:

  • Maintain eye contact with the speaker.
  • Provide clues that you are actively involved in listening.
  • Focus on content, not delivery
  • Avoid emotional involvement
  • Avoid distractions
  • Refrain from formulating an immediate response
    Ask questions
  • Use the gap between the rate of speech.
  • Be willing to accept revisions
  • Choose the right environment
  • Stay active by asking questions for yourself

(Source: http://hubpages.com/hub/Importance-of-Listening-Skills-in-Professional-Life)

I remember my dad saying to me years ago … “God gave you two ears and one mouth for a very good reason … make sure you use them in the that ratio” It took me some time to work out that meant you should listen twice as much as you talk! Admittedly I was quite young at the time 🙂

Until next time.

James E

The importance of listening

They say that a picture is worth a thousand words. So here we go.

Julian Treasure (what a fantastic surname! ) is the chair of the Sound Agency, a firm that advises worldwide businesses — offices, retailers, hotels — on how to use sound. He asks us to pay attention to the sounds that surround us. How do they make us feel: productive, stressed, energized, acquisitive?

Click on this link to watch the video. 5 ways to listen better

Any professional adviser, including accountants, can always learn to become a better listener. Did you hear that? 🙂

See you next post.

All my best,

James E

Two ears and one mouth

I’m roughly about halfway through the book I’m currently working on titled “What do Accounting Clients Really Want?”

In earlier posts you would have heard me bang on about the importance of listening when meeting and discussing issues with clients and pitching for new business.

I was scanning the web the other day and found an excellent list of barriers to effective listening and strategies to promote better listening.

Barriers to effective listening

There are many reasons as to why individuals fail to listen successfully, These include:

  1. Interrupting
  2. Faking attention and tuning out
  3. Becoming emotional
  4. Jumping to conclusions
  5. Getting distracted
  6. Pre-judging the subject
  7. Wrong focus
  8. Gathering only facts
  9. Inflexibility while listening
  10. Avoiding complicated subjects

Strategies to promote better listening

You can improve your listening skills by following some of the strategies mentioned below: Maintain eye contact with the speaker.

  1. Provide clues that you are actively involved in listening.
  2. Focus on content, not delivery
  3. Avoid emotional involvement
  4. Avoid distractions
  5. Refrain from formulating an immediate response
  6. Ask questions
  7. Use the gap between the rate of speech.
  8. Be willing to accept revisions
  9. Choose the right environment
  10. Stay active by asking questions for yourself

(Source: http://hubpages.com/hub/Importance-of-Listening-Skills-in-Professional-Life)

I remember my dad saying to me years ago … “God gave you two ears and one mouth for a very good reason … make sure you use them in the that ratio” It took me some time to work out that meant you should listen twice as much as you talk! Admittedly I was quite young at the time  🙂

See you next post.

James E