I am not an animal … I’m a human being (1 of 2)

As the URL for the site suggests this blog is all about the sharing of ideas and insights into what clients really want – specifically professional services clients – accounting, law, management consulting, engineering and the like.

I came across a wonderful article written by Keith Ferrazzi that was originally published in Fast Company back in June 2006. Despite being 5 years old the lessons contained within are as fresh and relevant today as they were back in the pre GFC world of 2006.  I love the idea of sharing with you knowledge available on web sites, journals or magazines that professional advisers like those listed above  may not have on their radar. By the way … the reason for the photo of the Elephant Man made famous by John Hurt in the 1980 movie of the same name is his famous haunting statement during a particularly cruel scene – “I’m not an animal I’m a Human Being!” It will make more sense as you read the piece below. I’ve also included the video clip link to give it more context.

Enjoy the article!

 

Build real personal relationships with your clients–so they’ll reveal to you what they really want, what could really drive their decision but can’t be written in an RFP.

You may remember the 1990 movie Crazy People in which Dudley Moore plays an advertising executive whose idea to write “honest” advertising copy like the following lands him in an insane asylum:

Volvo… they’re boxy, but they’re safe.
Porsche…you can’t get laid in one, but you will once you get out.

As outrageous as those taglines were, they were successful in the movie (and probably would have been in real life, too) because they spoke to what people really wanted–far beyond what car companies learn from customers in rank-the-features surveys. In these cases, customers didn’t just want cars that got them from point A to point B. They bought a Volvo for the peace of mind and the Porsche for a new hope of finding romance.

Our organizations face the same problem automakers do. I certainly don’t think my firm’s marketing and sales consulting services or training offerings are anywhere close to commodities. I believe we have deeper insight, more experience, a watertight methodology…a laundry list of reasons why we can provide value no one else can. I bet you feel the same way about your core products and services. But the truth is that many other organizations claim to have the same things we have. And if you delude yourself thinking that what’s on your website and printed marketing collateral is significantly different from what others have written down, then you’re full of it.

That’s why we have to build real personal relationships with our clients–so they’ll reveal to us what they really want, what could really drive their decision but can’t be written in an RFP. Then, and only then, do we get opportunities to offer generous solutions to their problems that convince them to purchase our core products and services.

You have to approach them as people as well as professionals. Show them you’re human by letting your guard down. Share your passions and learn about theirs. See yourself as a combination of consultant, life coach, therapist, and friend. Ask insightful questions, actively listening for what really motivates or frustrates them personally. Then, when you have a deep understanding of what they really want, try to bundle a solution that, first and foremost, solves one of their problems and, ideally, includes your product or service.

Watch the Elephant Man YouTube Clip to get the full impacthttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q2KEN8XBL0

See you next post for part 2.

All my best,

James