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How should accountants communicate?

You would have heard the old saying, the medium is the message made famous by Marshall McLuhan the renowned Canadian educationalist and communication expert. Although Marshall coined the phrase almost 40 years ago, in today’s information smorgasbord, it is as relevant as it was back in the 1960′s.

Below is an excerpt from a good friend of mine – Antoni Lee. Antoni advises clients on how to perform at their peak when communicating in public. He is one of Australia’s most in-demand communication trainers for journalists, business leaders, corporate spokespeople, politicians, academics and the arts sector. Suffice to say he knows a thing or two about communication.

Below is an excerpt from Antoni’s site. It is titled “Which Communication Medium is Best?” You can read the full article by visiting http://www.rhetorica.com.au/?p=404

Given the need for accountants/advisers to clearly communicate to their clients and stakeholders, Antoni’s wisdom below will be most useful.

Choice confers freedom—or paralysis

An overload of options kills decision-making. At gut level we know, and statistically it’s true, that the more options we have, the lower the chance we’ll choose the ‘right’ answer. A prevalence of opinions and conflicting theories doesn’t help. In communication, it’s rich media versus media naturalness versus social naturalness, etc. How can we know which one is right? Neither do Internet searches provide clarity. Google’s 200m results for ‘Which communication medium is best?’ gave several stupid answers on page one, including three links to psychic hotlines.

Before answering our headline question it will be helpful to ask a few more questions to narrow down the communication context:

  1. Who is your audience?
  2. Why are you communicating?
  3. What is your message?
  4. What is your urgency?
  5. How much money do you have?

Your answers will likely point to some media over others.

Qualifications aside, below is a non-exhaustive, non-academic, discussed-over-coffee, list of strengths and weaknesses in a short list of mediums.

Internet video is best kept short and sharp

  1. Easy to record and upload. Sometimes too easy. See (2).
  2. Weak content and production are obvious.
  3. Easy to find, download and watch, if your audience have broadband connections and can find your content.
  4. File sizes can be a drag.
  5. Requires full audience attention. Most of us don’t watch videos while driving.
  6. Can work for big screens or small. Think before you leap.
  7. Potentially engaging, human, intimate, but too often wooden and inauthentic, in spite of the potential.
  8. Relatively inexpensive to produce, even if you decide to buy cameras and chromakey screens, etc.
  9. Relatively visual. You can creatively incorporate demonstrations, locations, props and other aids.
  10. If loaded to a public site (e.g. YouTube), your video could be on the Internet for a long time.
  11. Linear, chronological. Great for stories and gags and conversations, but offers limited audience selection and control.
  12. Prone to rambles and inefficiency, the hallmarks of natural speech. Proper planning and preparation can alleviate these problems, without harming effectiveness.
  13. The illusion of spontaneity.

Summary: Video is mostly one way, but great for short lists, updates, entertaining and conveying personality.

Podcasts offer portability, repeatability and the opportunity to educate

I have downloaded more than 500 podcasts onto my MacBook Air and iPod—but only listen to a couple of podcasters regularly.

  1. Podcasts are easy to get repeat access and to download.
  2. Portable. Audiences can download podcasts to all kinds of devices, including smart phones, and listen while walking, riding, commuting, gardening, etc. (Hopefully not while performing brain surgery.)
  3. File sizes are usually much smaller than video.
  4. Easy and inexpensive to make.
  5. Unless it’s instrumental, you’re reliant on words and how you say them. There can be a lot in that. Requires a broader communication repertoire than most people have, to pull it off well and consistently.
  6. Prone to rambles and inefficiency.
  7. Linear, chronological.
  8. Searching through is not as efficient as with text, but the fast-forward and rewind tools are getting better all the time.
  9. Great for conversations, interviews.

Summary: Podcasts are also mostly one way, but great for updates, lectures, seminars, lessons, conversations, interviews—and telling stories.

See you next post.

Keep well,

James E